Flinders Pier

Sea nymph. Image credit - Julian Finn, Museums Victoria
Amphibolis antarctica. At Flinder's Pier
Yellow crested weedfish. Image credit: Julian Finn, Museums Victoria
Cristiceps aurantiacus. At Flinder's Pier
Ornate cowfish. Image credit: Julian Finn, Museums Victoria
Aracana ornata. At Flinder's Pier
Red-handed shrimp. Image credit - Julian Finn, Museums Victoria
Palaemon serenus. At Flinders Pier
Common seadragon (Phyllopteryx taeniolatus)
Common seadragon
(Phyllopteryx taeniolatus)
Anemone, and unidentified anemone. Image credit - Julian Finn, Museums Victoria
Epiactis australiensis. At Flinder's Pier
Common seadragon. Image credit - Julian Finn, Museums Victoria
Phyllopteryx taeniolatus. At Flinder's Pier
Pregnant common seadragon. Image credit - Julian Finn, Museums Victoria
Phyllopteryx taeniolatus. At Flinder's Pier
Common seadragon. Image credit - Julian Finn, Museums Victoria
Phyllopteryx taeniolatus. At Flinder's Pier
Bluespotted goatfish. Image credit - Julian Finn, Museums Victoria
Upeneichthys vlamingii. At Flinder's Pier
Mado. Image credit - Julian Finn, Museums Victoria
Atypichthys strigatus. At Flinder's Pier
Smallmouth hardyhead. Image credit - Julian Finn, Museums Victoria
Atherinosoma microstoma. At Flinder's Pier

The bays’ dolphins are much loved. To help protect them, the Dolphin Research Institute (DRI) is studying the resident dolphins in both Western Port and Port Phillip to deepen our scientific understanding so we can better protect these mammals.  

Anemone in seagrass

Seagrasses, saltmarshes and mangroves are an environmental powerhouse, storing carbon for thousands of years, while also preventing carbon from breaking down and entering the atmosphere. It’s called “blue carbon” and it’s much faster and more efficient than our tropical rainforests.